Category Archives: link

Allowed To Return on tumblr!

http://allowedtoreturn.tumblr.com/

Allowed To Return is now on tumblr! Now that the “blog as a school project” is done, I’m trying to get back into writing here and making ATR a bit less formal. Since I started this project, I’ve been using Google Reader to star and keep track of interesting repatriation-related links that I might want to talk about on here.  I thought migrating this activity to tumblr would make it more public and accessible. The tumblelog will contain close to all repatriation news articles and links I come across, while this blog will feature my thoughts on a sampling of those links. Hope you enjoy it!

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quirkyme:belagen:kari-shma:(Photographer: Cindy)

quirkyme:belagen:kari-shma:(Photographer: Cindy)

quirkyme:belagen:kari-shma:(Photographer: Cindy)

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Kid keeping a lending library of banned books in his locker

Kid keeping a lending library of banned books in his locker
Javier sez, “A teenager asks Yahoo! Questions whether maintaining a lending library in his school locker is illegal (as opposed of merely in contravention of school regulations). A school friend…

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f0g: ” Antiquites”  by Sue Wickham

f0g:
” Antiquites”  by Sue Wickham

f0g:

” Antiquites”  by Sue Wickham

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Endangered Languages

Check out UNESCO’s interactive world map of endangered languages. The site also includes safeguarding projects seeking to preserve linguistic diversity all over the world.

A quick search of Canada’s languages reveals two completely extinct languages, Tsetsaut and Pentlatch, both on the Northwest Coast. In all, according to the map, 88 of Canada’s native languages are in danger.

This week I had the great pleasure of listening to Herb Joe talk about how the repatriation of Stone T’xwelatse gave the youth of his community a renewed interest in their own history and culture. As I see it, keeping endangered languages alive doesn’t only consist of language programs. A big part of it is convincing new generations that these languages are worth learning, as well as putting the languages in a larger cultural context. Even more than the object, I think the process of repatriation connects a community with their cultural heritage.

(via TEDBlog)

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